Women in Sports and Events
The leading voice and resource for professional women in the business of sports.

Insights: How to Change Career Direction

Grow Grow

Photo credit: Constantin Stanciu/ Shutterstock.com

 

Ask the Expert! Through WISE Insights,Connect with knowledgeable experts to receive honest and thoughtful answers to your career-related questions, or read about challenges your peers are facing.

Question

Submitted by: WISE National member | 6-15 years professional experience

There is an emerging area that I'd like to move into: Fan engagement/experience. I've got a lot of practical, first-hand experience in these types of activities, but I'm not sure if hiring managers will give my resume a chance, considering how much experience I have at this point in my career. What is the best way to change career directions, or at least get an opportunity to speak with a hiring manager about what I can bring to the table with my wealth of experience?

Answer

You're right that relying on your resume is not a good idea. In reality, I've found that  resumes are usually used as a way to filter people out of the mix, not to qualify them. Think about it from the hiring manager's point-of-view; they have their "real" job and on top of that, many people are trying to get in front of them to discuss their open position. It's overwhelming.

The way to separate yourself from the pack is to put a face — or added value — to your name. Network yourself into places where you'll meet these hiring managers and can weave your two-minute pitch into the discussion. Leverage all the contacts you've made who are working in fan engagement/experience to set up coffees, calls, etc., so you can reinforce your value to your network and make it known that you're looking to focus more in this area. Don't forget to use LinkedIn — you can see who in your network is connected to the companies you've targeted. Ask for introductions and use them.

By the way, most companies are much more interested in what you can do for them moving forward versus what you've done in the past. Use that to your advantage and suggest ideas when talking to those you meet. Good luck!

Amanda Mitchell

About Amanda Mitchell

Amanda Mitchell, Corporate Navigator at Our Corporate Life, helps people just like you find what they love to do so they can have more of it in their work life. You'll be happier, your employer will be happier and ultimately corporate suffering will be reduced.

The opinions expressed are those of the author(s) alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of WISE or any employees or affiliates. WISE makes no representation as to the accuracy, completeness, validity, or usefulness of any of the information supplied by the author(s). WISE will not be liable for any errors or omissions in the information or any losses, injuries or damages arising from its use. Publication of the information should not be considered endorsement by WISE. By using this website, you accept this disclaimer in full.

Content and the contributor’s title, company and other biographical information were accurate at the time of publication and may have since changed.